PPQ SS13 : from front row to backstage at LFW

I died over the girls’ neon yellow eye makeup and chalky pink lips, which were like a contemporary, almost grungy, update of Brigite Bardot- and handily PPQ palettes were in the gift bags for the front row (there is nothing I love more than a gift bag), so prepare for my new look coming up soon.

Sep 17, 2012 at 5:00pm | Leave a comment

The thing that I love about fashion week is how the diversity of the collections is reflected in the styling, and the atmospheres that are created in ordinarily empty halls. It can all feel a little shallow on paper, but the theatre of a good show transcends a collection beyond expensive clothes on skinny ladies for me. And it’s the perfect opportunity for me to channel Cher Horowitz even more thoroughly than usual.

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Head to toe in PPQ lent by the lovely Amy.

Amy Molyneaux and Percy Parker, the label’s designers, describe the PPQ SS13 Fiasco Tech collection as ‘sophisticadelic’ - ‘from beach to private jet’ and although that might seem like the most fashion bizzy phrase I’ve every regurgitated, it’s actually pretty apt.

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From beach... to jet

The looks at the show ranged from swimwear to evening dresses and maintained a playful yet glamourous St Tropez 60s aesthetic- the great choice of millinery and eyewear with sleekly bouffant ponytails adding cohesion to the looks ranging from psychedelic kimonos to jewel toned eveningwear.

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Bold paisley and nautical stripe were combined startlingly effectively, in the current trend of pattern clashing, and the show finished with evening dresses that made me want to hijack a jet to Monaco.

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Jewel tone evening dresses - my ideal Casino wear

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I literally can’t imagine wanting to wear anything other than this on my yacht.

So, I might not be on a yacht any time soon, but I can usually find an opportunity to wear 60s print body con. I mean, if I looked like this girl, I’d wear it to Tesco:

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I died over the girls’ neon yellow eye makeup and chalky pink lips, which were like a contemporary, almost grungy, update of Brigite Bardot- and handily PPQ palettes were in the gift bags for the front row (there is nothing I love more than a gift bag), so prepare for my new look coming up soon.

Lightly groomed brows, defined, doll-like eyelashes and a slick of black liner made the girls look understatedly immaculate. If I work out how to make my hair look as pristine as the GHD team made the models’, I’ll be a very happy lady.

The theatrical and styling aspects of the PPQ shows have been down to Pandora Lennard for last two seasons, the show’s stylist. It is down to her to add cohesion and excitement to the looks, and I went backstage and asked her a few questions about what it’s like to be living my childhood dream of dressing up pretty ladies however she likes.

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Me and Pandora gothing up for Fashion Week

How did you get into fashion?

I fell into fashion. I was always brought up to think I would have a conventional career and never thought it was a legitimate option to do something creative. One summer I was bored and decided to intern, and after a taste of assisting Chloe Kerman and Patti Wilson and working on Meadham Kirchhoff’s first catwalk show, I was hooked. I dropped out of university and got a job at a magazine straight away.

What do you like most about working in styling?

Fashion can have its massive downsides but at the end of the day I really thrive on the fast pace and the amazing people. You really get to collaborate with the most creative people and push your boundaries beyond what you can imagine alone.

What is your favourite aspect of a show and particularly doing the PPQ show?

When the show happens it’s hugely satisfying- after a week of all nighters, tears and tantrums it finally comes together and is all over so quickly. I also love the casting process, it’s great to get to know new girls and we have a fantastic casting director (Mathew Laskey) who is always a step ahead of the game.

What was your aesthetic for the PPQ show and how did you decide on it?

The collection had big psychedelic prints and floaty chiffon. It was very late 60s, so we looked at Jean Shrimpton- mainly as a beauty and hair reference, but tried to keep the styling and hair and makeup as fresh and modern as possible at the same time. We took the best elements of that era and updated them.

What’s your proudest moment as a stylist?

I don't think there's been any one moment, being at certain memorable shows that have gone down in history are probably things I'll never forget.

What would you recommend for anyone who wants to get into styling?

Make sure that you look at every single show on style.com each season and pre =-season, make mood boards of the trends you see, define what designers and styles you like personally, learn models.com’s top 50 models and study new-comers pages each season. Expect to intern and work very hard for very little money for a fair amount of time.

What's your favourite trend at the moment?

70s printed suits for autumn winter are my favourite, Miu Miu, Prada and Marni did great ones.